Ranking 4 potential future managers on the Cardinals roster

ST. LOUIS, MO - APRIL 07: Yadier Molina #4, Albert Pujols #5,and Adam Wainwright #50 he St. Louis Cardinals sit in the dugout prior to the start of the Opening Day game against the Pittsburgh Pirates at Busch Stadium on April 7, 2022 in St. Louis, Missouri. (Photo by Scott Kane/Getty Images)
ST. LOUIS, MO - APRIL 07: Yadier Molina #4, Albert Pujols #5,and Adam Wainwright #50 he St. Louis Cardinals sit in the dugout prior to the start of the Opening Day game against the Pittsburgh Pirates at Busch Stadium on April 7, 2022 in St. Louis, Missouri. (Photo by Scott Kane/Getty Images) /
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The St. Louis Cardinals have a rich history of producing managers around the league, who could be next in line?

One of the major bright spots for the St. Louis Cardinals this season has been first year manager Oli Marmol. Marmol brings a level of leadership, accountability, and baseball prowess that has taken the club to the next level.

The Cardinals have a rich history of mangers in their organization. Names like Red Schoendienst, Whitey Herzog, and Tony La Russa have all set the example of what it means to manage at a high level. Many players who played in the organization, like Marmol, have gone on to manager the club or other major league clubs.

With such a rich tradition, it makes you wonder which current Cardinals players or coaches could go on to manage at some point in their careers? Some of these names have indicated interest already, while others display the qualities you’d want in a leader of the clubhouse. Here are potential Cardinal managers within the St. Louis clubhouse.

Paul Goldschmidt

On the surface, Paul Goldschmidt may not seem like the kind of player that would go on to manage a clubhouse, but based on the respect he has gained from players in the organization, he may be a sneaky good fit.

Goldschmidt has a Hall of Fame level work ethic, one that has been noted by both players and coaches. His attention to details, including “little things” like rounding bases, has made him one of the premier players in the game.  Managers need to balance being a respected leader, terrific teacher, and have an eye for every part of the game. Goldschmidt clearly does.

While it may not be likely that Goldschmidt would pursue a career managing teams, he certainty would have the talent to do so. Often times, superstar level players have a difficult time leading teams as they may not be able to relate to the “glue guys” on a roster. Goldschmidt’s deminer makes him the perfect superstar-turned manager in the future.

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