Picking the five best St. Louis Cardinals third basemen since 1967

ST. LOUIS, MO - APRIL 17: Scott Rolen #27 of the St. Louis Cardinals fields the ball against the Pittsburgh Pirates on April 17, 2007 at Busch Stadium in St. Louis, Missouri. The Pirates beat the Cards 6-1. (Photo by Dilip Vishwanat/Getty Images)
ST. LOUIS, MO - APRIL 17: Scott Rolen #27 of the St. Louis Cardinals fields the ball against the Pittsburgh Pirates on April 17, 2007 at Busch Stadium in St. Louis, Missouri. The Pirates beat the Cards 6-1. (Photo by Dilip Vishwanat/Getty Images) /
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DENVER, CO – MAY 09: Coach Ken Oberkfell #58 of the New York Mets oversees batting practice prior to facing the Colorado Rockies at Coors Field on May 9, 2011 in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Doug Pensinger/Getty Images)
DENVER, CO – MAY 09: Coach Ken Oberkfell #58 of the New York Mets oversees batting practice prior to facing the Colorado Rockies at Coors Field on May 9, 2011 in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Doug Pensinger/Getty Images) /

2. Ken Oberkfell

Ken Oberkfell is one of the most forgotten stars of the 80’s Cardinals. Nevertheless, Oberkfell was an important cog in the wheel of the early Whiteyball era of Cardinal baseball. Never spectacular, Oberkfell could be described as steady, solid, and reliable during his years playing third for the Cardinals.

Oberkfell, who originally came up as a second baseman, was moved to third in 1981 to make room for Tommy Herr at second. Third base was where he stayed until he was traded to the Atlanta Braves in 1984.

At third, he was no defensive slouch and was often overshadowed in the infield by Gold Glovers Ozzie Smith and Keith Hernandez. However, at third base, he led the National League twice in Fielding Percentage (’82 and ’83) and double plays turned once (’81).

Never a prolific batter, his performance at the plate was often overlooked because of the likes of Hernandez, Willie McGee, Lonnie Smith, and George Hendrick. However, he had an eight-year slash line .292/.364/.381, with an OPS+ of 107.

As a Cardinal, he never hit less than .269 and as the third baseman, he was always in the top five in fielding percentage. When Ken Oberkfell walked on the field, he could be counted on with his glove and his bat and that consistency puts him high on this list.

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