St. Louis Cardinals: The All-Star voting conundrum

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PHOENIX, AZ - JULY 03: Yadier Molina #4 of the St. Louis Cardinals at bat during the MLB game against the Arizona Diamondbacks at Chase Field on July 3, 2018 in Phoenix, Arizona. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
PHOENIX, AZ - JULY 03: Yadier Molina #4 of the St. Louis Cardinals at bat during the MLB game against the Arizona Diamondbacks at Chase Field on July 3, 2018 in Phoenix, Arizona. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images) /
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St. Louis Cardinals
LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 27: Cody Bellinger #35 of the Los Angeles Dodgers celebrates in the dugout after hitting a solo home run in the eighth inning of the game against the Chicago Cubs at Dodger Stadium on June 27, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images) /

Every year, All-Star voting can be greatly skewed and distorted by a variety of unworthy votes, and some of the biggest offenders outside of the St. Louis Cardinals all fall into the same category.

Exhibit C: Blind loyalty

We saved the worst for last, because these people are just brutal. These are the fans who post their ballot to their team’s Twitter page in hopes of public recognition.

Look, I get that you love your team and its players, but doing this is just flat out wrong. Whether it be the best player, or a player that everyone would love to watch on a big stage, people should vote for players that all fans will enjoy watching.

It might not seem like a big deal, but when players are receiving bonuses for All-Star appearances in their contracts, it goes to show that the game is held in higher regard then many fans think.

Why is voting for your own players a problem then? Well, we can draw a parallel with the 2016 Presidential Election, where many Democrats implored people to vote for them instead of jumping to a third party. This third party jump was considered supporting the other side because the top parties needed every vote they could get to beat the other side.

The same thing can be applied to All-Star voting. Those votes in random players could have turned the tides between two players if the votes were applied correctly. This can affect the game, which in turn affects which league receives home field advantage in the World Series.

So seriously, don’t be that guy who votes Cody Bellinger in 35 times a day just because you love the Dodgers.

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